Detaching Yourself From Your Items

Some people are naturally anti-pack rats, doing spring cleaning four times a year and minimizing what they have around the home. However, this isn't true of everyone; for some people, objects are more symbolic, especially if they have any sort of good memory associated with them. Therefore, it can be difficult, detaching yourself from your things. If you're having issues with putting the things you own into garage sale boxes, try following these steps to let go.

An old bicycle waiting to be sold in a garage sale.

As you unpack each item from the attic or basement, discern which are going to be difficult to detach from. Think fondly about the memories you have surrounding the object, whether that's the comfort of a beloved grandparent or a good day at the fair with your immediate family or something completely different. Take time to linger over what was so special to you about the item and the memories associated with it.

If you're afraid of forgetting the reason the item was so special to you, record the memories. Start a document on the computer or find a notebook and write down everything you can remember about that day or time. The act of recording the memory may actually help you to recall it later, and if you do forget it, you'll have a tangible reminder without having to keep around an item you can no longer store.

It may still be difficult to relinquish the items associated with memories you love. Realize that you aren't going to use it anymore, or that you just don't have room. Getting rid of the item is a practical choice at this point, and if you don't overcome your tendencies and put it in that garage sale box, you'll end up lugging the item when you move or having to throw out something else more practical because the memory-item is taking up the space.

Don't linger over the sale, when it comes time for someone to take the item home. You can tell the shopper how special the item was, and if they seem interested, you can give them a brief recount of the tale surrounding it. However, the longer you dwell on the fact that the item is about to exchange hands, the harder it will be and the more you'll be tempted to snatch it back and refuse to sell it.

Now that you've prepared the items you're going to sell, you're ready to use our free advertising over at GarageSaleCow.com! We hope to see you there.




Comments (17) -

Joey Bennett
Joey Bennett
2/14/2013 3:24:51 PM #

Detach Yourself From Your Items - Its easier said than done. I personally have a hard time letting things go especially those from my childhood. My old toys are still intact and are kept in a box. Even if I plan to give those away to other kids, I just can't really do it and I get stuck with the memories I had with those things - like my childhood, my friends, etc... Having a hard time letting go here Frown

Brian Foster
Brian Foster
2/14/2013 3:35:12 PM #

Yeah bro, just don't rush things. You can try the suggestions in the article by taking photographs so that when you miss your toy, you could easily browse and remember that object. I got that same problem before but I outgrew it. I now learned to let go of old things because it could never be the same. Maybe your hanging on because you can't forget that mistake you did or event that happened that you wished it didn't. Just forgive yourself and move on.

Devin Jake Stevens
Devin Jake Stevens
2/14/2013 3:36:17 PM #

Yeah bro, just don't rush things. You can try the suggestions in the article by taking photographs so that when you miss your toy, you could easily browse and remember that object. I got that same problem before but I outgrew it. I now learned to let go of old things because it could never be the same. Maybe your hanging on because you can't forget that mistake you did or event that happened that you wished it didn't. Just forgive yourself and move on.

Joey Bennett
Joey Bennett
2/14/2013 3:37:12 PM #

Thanks guys, gladly appreciate your comments. I'll take your advices to help me through this...thanks again

Matthew Smith
Matthew Smith
2/16/2013 7:49:51 AM #

I've been having this problem in my life since I was a kid. Hardly can let go and give things away not until last year. I attended this support group that lets us share our experiences and helps us cope with letting go. I started on small things like an old pen, a card, small accessories and  I didn't even noticed that I slowly adapted and sold things in garage sales. Now, it's not that hard anymore because I realized that it would serve somebody else better. Since I already used it, its time to share it with other people and even gain some money for it.

Gregory Walter
Gregory Walter
2/16/2013 7:55:18 AM #

Really? You have this kind of problem? From what I've learned from one of our growth and development classes, problems with letting go means that you have a problem with your infancy which has a developmental task of Trust vs Mistrust. If you didn't have a consistent caregiver and your needs were not met immediately like feeding and changing diapers, then you're more prone to have letting go issues and become orally fixated.

Willie Green
Willie Green
2/16/2013 8:00:45 AM #

Can you call this as hoarding? I've seen a few shows about this and if it comes to a point that it would affect your health then you should consult and ask for help from a professional. You need to check with a psychologist or a team to help you pick up the pieces of your life and put them back together.

Ricky Pope
Ricky Pope
2/23/2013 11:42:07 AM #

Think things over and over again before making any decision so you won't have regrets in the future. If you can't let it go yet, then do not force yourself in doing it. Take your time and maybe in the next few months, you'll feel comfortable in selling your sentimental items and you'll be ready by then. It's hard to let go of something which means a lot to you but it's nothing compared to letting go someone who's been your life. See? People can move on with heart breaks, how much more if it's just an object. You can do it :0

Arnold Sweetney
Arnold Sweetney
2/24/2013 9:35:26 AM #

I had a transforming robot shaped as a vintage railway train. My mom bought it when I was in second grade and I had it until I was in college. I had a subject where we would do an outreach program to teach less fortunate children who can't afford a decent education. My student was a boy, named Cris, 8 years of age. We bonded for 3 months, because we went every saturday in their school to tutor them on subjects they're weak on - mostly all of the subjects.

Unlike other students, he was very eager and enthusiastic to learn new things. We were nearing the end of that program and it was december. I thought of ways I could make him happy this Christmas but all I can think of is to give him toys. I then realized I had so much toys that are just staying in the basement. So alongside my favorite train robot, I gave my toys to Cris and he was very happy when he opened his present. He was very thankful that I gave him toys to play with and share with his classmates.

He thought that he had learned a lot from me but it was the other way around. He taught me a  lesson that has forever changed has my life - SHARING.

Paul Randolph
Paul Randolph
2/24/2013 9:43:20 AM #

Sharing was not an issue at all for me. I was taught to share my blessings to other people by my mom because she worked for a non government organization aiming to provide homes for homeless people on the streets. At a young age, I was exposed to the harsh realities of poverty and hunger since my mother would bring me along when they have events like feeding programs for street kids.

I met a lot of people and listened to their stories about life. We see to it that we donate our old books, clothes, canned goods to other people even if we don't have that much either.

Alonzo Prince
Alonzo Prince
2/24/2013 9:53:23 AM #

I saw this family in El Paso, near the border of Mexico, in Extreme Makeover - Home Edition who were helping people from Mexico. They spent all their money in feeding hundred's of kids everyday and donating goods in form of food and clothes to the other side every weekend. They did not even finish their house to make way to help those people. They only had one functioning bathroom, their terrace was not usable and their living room looks like a garage sale because of all the donations they receive.

I was amazed that they detached themselves from the material things in this world. They could have spent all that money building a mansion and having a luxurious life but they choose not to. They were considering and taking care of others before themselves. They were heroes to the people in Mexico and they were honored with the CNN Heroes Award.

Leandro Sexton
Leandro Sexton
2/24/2013 10:01:30 AM #

Even if how rich we are, when we die, we can never bring those along when we go to heaven or wherever it may be. We are consumed of our desires to acquire more and more wealth that we slowly forget the important things in life. We forget to spend time with our family, we go abroad to seek greener pasteur leaving our family and kids behind. We think that by giving them money and all the things they want, we can compensate the times that we were not there.

But we are all wrong. Money can't ever buy us happiness. I'd prefer to be poor and have a complete happy family than be rich with no one with me. We can spend money all we want and we could just replace and earn those. But our family? Every moment spent apart could never be taken back. You only realize the importance of your family when they're gone. That's one of the hardest lessons in life. Share everyday with your family and have the courage to say "I love you" while they're still here.

Terry Holman
Terry Holman
2/24/2013 10:06:39 AM #

I sympathize with you Leandro. I'm not that brave yet to say and remind my loved ones that I LOVE THEM SO MUCH. The more I try to show how I love them, I'm doing the exact opposite and in turn I hurt them. I'd like to ask for forgiveness for the bad things I've done to my family and I can only express it here. I'll pray harder to God to give me the strength and courage to let my family know how much I care and love them before its too late.

Deborah Williams
Deborah Williams
2/25/2013 12:28:50 AM #

I'm really a sentimental person.. I find it hard to let go or throw things away especially if they came from the people I love. Even simple things like a note that came from them would be really hard to throw away.. I also find it really hard to give away or sell my clothes and things to other people.. If i decide to give it, I would have the tendency to think about the memories i had and the person who gave me that item.. then, i would eventually decide to keep it.. In fact, every time i plan a garage sale, i would always end up canceling it because I can't let go of my belongings..

I know it seems unreasonable that i keep my things for myself and find it hard to let go of them when i know that there are people on the streets not even capable of clothing or feeding themselves.. This is the person i am.. I just have to learn how to detach myself from these things..

Jacob Holland
Jacob Holland
2/25/2013 12:47:09 AM #

Hi Matthew Smith! It's good to know that you've finally overcome your issue! I can totally relate.. I've also been a person who can't get rid of things that are really not that important.. i love shopping.. it makes me feel good.. I can't describe this feeling I have during and after shopping.. especially when i have tried my bargains.. I have a closet that's full of clothes; and most of them i don't really wear.. It's like I just like to know that they're there even though I don't get to use or wear them..

I have quite gotten over this period in my life.. Little by little, i am able to give out some of my things.. donate them for charity.. and ,hopefully, set up a garage sale soon..

Marion James Wilton
Marion James Wilton
3/9/2013 2:04:46 AM #

We have this very old TV in our house. It is one of the oldest things here and it's not working anymore. Would you believe that my dad doesn't want to get the TV be placed on the junk?

My mom then told me that it is the first appliance my dad bought with his own money when they got married. Well, I've realized how important it must be for him to have that thing around because it's something that reminds him of his hard work and dedication for his family.

Pierce Stiller
Pierce Stiller
4/10/2013 11:07:30 AM #

Attachment to an item is not issue. We tend to insert emotions with our valuable things wherein we keep on having them around even if it's not used anymore. Detaching doesn't mean that we have to FORGET about that certain object's value, but to certainly REMEMBER the memories it brought us.

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